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Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris

Stephanie is a freelance writer and novelist whose work has appeared on NYPost.com, PSMag.com, the Intuit Small Business Blog, and many others. She is the Simon & Schuster author of 8 children's books, including the Piper Morgan chapter book series, 25 Roses, and 30 Days of No Gossip.

Humans aren’t the only species that show a preference for left-handedness or right-handedness. In fact, cats, dogs, and other animals have also demonstrated a preference for either the left or right side of their bodies. And new research may extend that behavior to insects.

A team of researchers at the Queensland Brain Institute recently discovered that honeybees can show a preference for either their left or right sides, although seem to have no preference at all. The preferences weren’t specific to any particular type of honeybee, showing just how unique these insects are in their personality traits.

Each day, a UK resident named Matt Rogers posts a video on his YouTube channel, where he offers his thoughts about Planet X. Under the name Sky Watcher, Rogers makes predictions about the alleged mini solar system, also known as NIBIRU. Rogers and other conspiracy theorists believe that the mystery system will soon pass by our own planet, causing serious disruptions in our weather patterns.

But our government is denying that all of this is about to happen, Rogers claims, saying that officials are afraid of inciting panic with an official announcement. If Rogers’ predictions are correct, those very officials will instead retreat to underground bunkers for safety while NIBIRU passes by, leaving those aboveground to fend for ourselves.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017 00:00

Depression Connected to Early Death Risk

Depression has always been considered an emotional issue, taking a toll on a person’s mental well-being. However, in recent years, medical professionals have begun to recognize its physiological effects on sufferers, as well.

A new Canadian study furthers this thinking, connecting depression to an overall shortened lifespan. After reviewing information on 3,410 adults dating back to 1952, the researchers found a link between depression and an increased risk of early death.

The team noticed that the risk for premature death was greatest in the years immediately following a depressive episode, which they felt demonstrated how treatment could possibly play an important life-saving role.

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