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It’s only natural to assume that the future can have no effect whatsoever on what happens today, since it’s still ahead of us. For decades, though, physicists have worked to prove that what happens to particles in the future can actually impact particles today – an affect called retrocausality.

The theory is so fascinating, Einstein even tackled it. In the end, he disagreed, coining it, “spooky action at a distance,” but scientists aren’t so sure. Recently two physicists dug into the theory of retrocausality, with experts comparing particles to a blurry cloud, rather than billiard balls running down a table. As such, a particle may very well have the ability to impact the past as well as the future.

Published in Our Blog
Saturday, 27 January 2018 00:00

Could a Newly-Discovered Stone Be from Space?

Generally, when geologists find rocks and stones, they can immediately identify them. Even if they aren’t familiar with a discovery, they can trace it to something found in the immediate area. But a pebble recovered more than two decades ago in Egypt so far doesn’t match anything previously found in our solar system.

The pebble, named the Hypatia stone, has been studied extensively over the years, with scientists announcing in 2013 that it had not come from Earth. This was based on the compounds found on the stone, which can’t be traced to anything on our surface.

Published in Our Blog

The news spread quickly, with the media telling the world that skull fragments found in Morocco were identified as being approximately 300,000 years old. The fragments—belonging to three adults, a child, and an adolescent—meant that homo sapiens may have roamed the Earth 100,000 years earlier than previously thought, igniting excitement among archaeology fans across the globe.

But scientists say evolution is far more complicated. Evolutionary biologist Jean-Jacques Hublin and his team dubbed the skulls “early Homo sapiens,” but others in the field are more skeptical. Some have expressed disdain for the way Hublin and his team were so quick to say this is proof that the “earliest” Homo sapiens was around 300,000 years ago. Evolution is gradual, the experts point out, with no definite beginning or ending.

Published in Our Blog
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