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Many have joked about a day when we'll be able to make a phone call or snap a photo by just thinking about it. But a new app is putting this concept into reality. The app, called MindRDR, utilizes a headset from a biosensor company and Google Glass to allow users to conduct such activities as taking photos and uploading them to Instagram.

Noting that Google Glass wearers must use voice and touch commands to use Google Glass, a company called This Place wanted to take the technology to the next level. They believed that requiring these actions from users limited disabled users from taking advantage of the technology. The company decided to create an app that would allow Google Glass wearers to execute commands merely by thinking about them.

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Visitors aren't allowed internet access while in North Korea, but that didn't stop iReporter Kenny Zhu from using Google Glass during his stay. While in the area, Zhu recorded various landmarks and made personal observations, which he made publicly available after his trip. After his initial clearance, Zhu was able to use the small device to capture unprecedented photos of the mysterious country.

At first, North Korean officials were reluctant to let Zhu use the device. They inspected it carefully, asking him a variety of questions about how the device worked and what it did. His approval to use the device was contingent on him only showing the country in a positive light. In fact, one official was captured on camera inspecting the device, but Zhu left him out of his public releases to protect himself, as well as the officials.

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It wasn't so long ago that people wondered, "Did it really cost Google so much to make Google Glass that they have to charge $1500 for it?"

One analysis from 2013 compared the components in Glass with similar components in a smart watch. After making allowances for certain internal parts and displays, it was determined that Glass might have cost as much as $225 to make. If that, the writer suggested.

A more recent analysis from Teardown.com indicates that the $225 estimate may not have been conservative at all. In fact, the cost to make a Glass headset could be as low as $80.

A bill of materials estimate (which Teardown notes could change once the device is "fully analyzed") shows that the most expensive item analyzed is the CPU, which clocks in at just under $14. The unit's 5-megapixel camera ran Google an estimated $5.66, the display/touchscreen & glass $3.00 and the battery a mere dollar. Teardown.com also includes a nominal cost item for "Assembly & Test."

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